Uncategorized


For many people, 13 children would be more than enough.

But not for Annegret Raunigk.

The 65-year-old German grandmother recently gave birth to quadruplets, making her the oldest woman ever to do so.

grand-mother-quadruplets-20150525

The new arrivals increase her progeny to a total of 17 children. And let’s not forget her seven grandchildren.

Raunigk, a single mother, gave birth last week to three boys and one girl after a pregnancy of just under 26 weeks, the German broadcaster RTL reported.

The newborns — whose names are Neeta, Dries, Bence and Fjonn — were delivered by C-section and are being kept in incubators for premature babies, according to RTL.

Daughter wanted a younger sibling

Raunigk, a teacher from Berlin, made headlines 10 years ago when, at the age of 55, she gave birth to a daughter, Leila. And it was apparently Leila’s plea for a younger sibling that encouraged her mother to try again.

“I myself find life with children great,” Raunigk said earlier this year. “You constantly have to live up to new challenges. And that probably also keeps you young.”

To become pregnant, she used in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment with donated eggs that were fertilized.

One doctor tried to persuade her to abort one or two of the fetuses, but she refused to consider it.

Indian woman holds record

Raunigk, who had her first child at 21, is still not the oldest woman to give birth.

That record is held by Rajo Devi Lohan, an Indian woman who at 70 became the world’s oldest known first time mother after three rounds of IVF.

Her daughter Naveen will turn 7 later this year.

source: http://edition.cnn.com/2015/05/24/europe/germany-grandmother-quadruplets/

A 66-year-old who lived his whole life as a man was given a surprising diagnosis after visiting the doctor in Hong Kong with a swollen abdomen — he was a woman.

Doctors realised the patient was female after they found the swelling came from a large cyst on an ovary, the Hong Kong Medical Journal reported.

The condition was the result of two rare genetic disorders.

The subject had Turner syndrome, which affects girls and women and results from a problem with the chromosomes, with characteristics including infertility and short stature.

But he also had congenital adrenal hyperplasia, increasing male hormones and making the patient, who had a beard and a “micropenis”, appear like a man.

“Were it not due to the huge ovarian cyst, his intriguing medical condition might never have been exposed,” seven doctors from two of the city’s hospitals wrote in the study published Monday.

The 1.37 meters (4.5 feet) tall patient, who grew up as an orphan, was found to have no testes, a history of urinary leakage since childhood, and stopped growing after puberty at the age of 10.

The doctors said there have been only six cases where both genetic disorders have been reported in medical literature. Turner Syndrome on its own affects only one in 2,500 to 3,000 females.

The Vietnam-born Chinese patient decided to continue “perceiving himself as having a male gender with the possible need of testosterone replacement,” according to the journal.

Most men have a X and a Y chromosome and most women have a pair of X chromosomes. But people with Turner Syndrome tend to have only one X chromosome or are missing part of their second X chromosome.

http://ph.news.yahoo.com/hong-kong-man-finds-woman-doctor-visit-074723786.html

Hordes of orange-clad revelers took to the streets of towns and cities across the Netherlands on Monday to celebrate Queen’s Day, a public holiday that marks the official birthday of Queen Beatrix.

Members of the royal family traveled to the town of Rhenen to join in the fun, with Crown Prince Willem-Alexander making a particular splash. The heir to the throne eagerly put himself forward for a series of challenges, culminating in a popular local pastime: the toilet-bowl-tossing contest.

According to the blog Sanitation Updates, the prince attributed his not-inconsiderable aptitude for the sport to his chairmanship of UNSGAB, the United Nations Secretary-General’s Advisory Board on Water and Sanitation.

The contest brings to mind the the exploits of those members of the British royal family who took part in It’s A Royal Knockout, a bizarre TV game show fondly recalled as “the day when royalty lost the plot.”

Compared to the recently-disclosed leisure activities of another European monarch, Spain’s King Juan Carlos, though, it seems positively harmless.

http://photoblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/04/30/11469282-relinquishing-the-throne-dutch-prince-takes-part-in-toilet-bowl-tossing-contest?lite

Exterior of Fiekowsky's Berkshire Home
Exterior of Berkshire, Mass. home that cantilevers for 45 feet, 14 feet off of the ground
Eirik Johnson for The Wall Street Journal

Friends praise the panoramic views and spare nature of the vacation home of Boston architect Warren Schwartz and his wife, Sheila Fiekowsky. But “sometimes, there’s a feeling of, ‘What is holding this up?’,” said pianist Eve Wolf.

Boston architect Warren Schwartz designed and built a modern home of glass, steel and concrete in the Berkshires for himself and his wife Sheila, a longtime violinist for the Boston Symphony Orchestra. The three-bedroom home climbs to more than 30 feet, with views across the wooded hills and a rooftop terrace, where the Schwartzes watch the night sky in the summer.

Ms. Wolf, who noted that she trusts Mr. Schwartz’s handiwork, isn’t the only visitor to have experienced a brief moment of uncertainty. A slim, 17-by-90-foot rectangular volume of glass and steel, the house slopes down a hill in the Berkshires before dramatically cantilevering for 45 feet. The great room floats 14 feet above the ground and has walls of glass on three sides with sweeping views of the surrounding, hilly countryside. The home’s poured concrete floor vibrates when the couple’s 65-pound Standard poodle, Oberon, bounds with enthusiasm after a ball. (Mr. Schwartz blames Oberon’s particular bounding style.)

“I thought it was going to be a ranch house,” said the 59-year-old Ms. Fiekowsky, a violinist who plays with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, admitting she, too, was nervous when her husband told her he wanted to have half the house float in the air. Mr. Schwartz, whose firm Schwartz/Silver Architects has completed projects for clients including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Princeton University, noted that the house’s cantilevered space is counterbalanced by a massive concrete basement hidden in the hillside. He said it’s “overdesigned” for stability and can hold 60 people safely, plus several thousand pounds on the home’s rooftop terrace.

A Cantilevered Glass House

Visitors walk through a long slice of hallway, past three terraced bedrooms, before arriving in the great room. Round, steel support beams painted white slice across the home’s glass walls at varying angles. Midway through the home, thin steel sheets that have been folded into steps connect the home’s rooftop terrace to the basement-and-patio level.

Walls of frosted glass separate the 12-by-11-foot bedrooms from the hallway and translucent, honeycombed plastic doors slide away to reveal en-suite bathrooms. “I wanted everything to be very light in color, light in structure, and feel as much as possible like floating,” said Mr. Schwartz, age 67.

The décor, a high-low mix, is modern and minimal; a glass Le Corbusier table in the great room sits near an IKEA kitchen. The couple gravitated toward a color palette of black, grey, white and silver so the landscape outside would remain the star. (Even the dog’s black cage, partially covered in gray fabric, hews to the color palette.)

cantilevered space is counterbalanced by a massive concrete basement hidden in the hillside. He said it’s “overdesigned” for stability and can hold 60 people safely, plus several thousand pounds on the home’s rooftop terrace.

A Cantilevered Glass House

Visitors walk through a long slice of hallway, past three terraced bedrooms, before arriving in the great room. Round, steel support beams painted white slice across the home’s glass walls at varying angles. Midway through the home, thin steel sheets that have been folded into steps connect the home’s rooftop terrace to the basement-and-patio level.

Walls of frosted glass separate the 12-by-11-foot bedrooms from the hallway and translucent, honeycombed plastic doors slide away to reveal en-suite bathrooms. “I wanted everything to be very light in color, light in structure, and feel as much as possible like floating,” said Mr. Schwartz, age 67.

The décor, a high-low mix, is modern and minimal; a glass Le Corbusier table in the great room sits near an IKEA kitchen. The couple gravitated toward a color palette of black, grey, white and silver so the landscape outside would remain the star. (Even the dog’s black cage, partially covered in gray fabric, hews to the color palette.)

Great room dining room
Amid modern and minimalist decor, the landscape is the star of the great room.
Eirik Johnson for The Wall Street Journal

This isn’t the first attention-grabbing home the couple has built. In the 1980s, they built second home No. 1 on their 18-acre Berkshire site: a striking octagonal, stucco-and-wood, castle-like structure featured in several architectural magazines. Their children grew up in it over the summers, when Ms. Fiekowsky plays at nearby Tanglewood, the orchestra’s summer home. But after more than 20 years, Mr. Schwartz said, the wood was weathering poorly and the house felt dated.

With their children grown, Ms. Fiekowsky felt the call to create an adult home minus the swing set and basketball court of the previous building. Mr. Schwartz liked the idea of designing anew. They razed the octagonal house in 2007.

Mr. Schwartz drew partial inspiration for the cantilevered space from a family trip to the Grand Canyon, where they had stood at the precipice of a cliff watching the sun rise, and doodled plans during his wife’s concerts. Being his own client gave Mr. Schwartz some freedom. The walls in the home, for example, are unpainted plaster, which he feels looks richer, and some doors were left unframed as part of the home’s minimalist look.

“Nothing was supposed to distract from the essence of the house and the power of the view,” he said.

The couple spent a little over $1 million to build and furnish the home, completed in 2009. Other owners in the Berkshires, a vacation spot that’s particularly popular in the summer, include the pianist Emanuel Ax, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and other Boston Symphony Orchestra musicians. Up the road, an 1,800-square-foot home built in 2005 sold for $266,000 last summer.

The couple has hosted intimate wine receptions in the great room and catered cocktail parties on the rooftop terrace, complete with their neighbor’s black Angus cows wandering nearby. “I was there during the most magnificent thunderstorm,” recalled Truman Welch, an Episcopal priest who lives near the couple’s main home in Newton, Mass., “and it was like being in the middle of the storm.”

Last weekend, as gusts of wind lashed snow against the glass, Ms. Fiekowsky bribed Oberon with treats so he would show off his tricks. The only thing she’d change about the home? “More closet space,” she said.

http://realestate.yahoo.com/promo/living-room-ready-for-liftoff.html

 

He Pingping of China smiles as Sultan Kosen of Turkey rests his hands on He’s shoulders during a promotional event in Istanbul January 14, 2010. The world’s shortest man, China’s He Pingping who was just over 74 cm tall (29 inches), has died at the age of 21 from apparent heart complications.

http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/slideshow/photo//100316/ids_photos_india_wl/ra825657445.jpg/

With three eyes, four ears, three sex organs and eight feet, a “mutant” goat has become a tourist attraction in Ilocos Norte province in northern Philippines.

Radio dzBB reported on Monday that while the goat died shortly after it was born, people continue to flock to Mabuti village in Dingras town to see it.

Tourists who heard of the unique animal sought to get a glimpse of it.

The report said the goat had one of its three eyes and two of four ears located at the back of its head.

Despite the goat’s early death, local village officials plan to preserve the remains of the goat and turn it over to local authorities, the report said.

Dingras is a third-class town with a population of 35,793 people in 6,921 households.

http://www.gmanews.tv/story/181853/mutant-goat-attracts-tourists-in-ilocos-province

A South Korean woman who has failed the driver’s exam 775 times is not about give up on her hope of buying a truck one day to go into her own business, whether other drivers want her on the road or not.

Cha Sa-soon, 68, has been trying since 2005 to pass the written portion of the test to get a licence, but she has so far failed to get the 60 percent required to clear it.

“I’ve looked up some guidebooks to get a driver’s licence, and they were saying it takes at most five years to get this,” Cha said in North Jeolla province, where farmers on tractors or cows can be just as common on country roads as motor vehicles.

“It’s already been four years, so I might pass the test next time. That’s what I hope for.”

KOREA-DRIVER/

Driving schools in South Korea offer courses to enable applicants to walk away with a licence in a week. Cha has not been fortunate enough to set foot in such a class, which tends to congregate more in busy metropolitan areas, but she remains unfazed, even after having spent more than 10 million won ($6,800) on test applications.

“I believe you can achieve your goal if you persistently pursue it,” she says. “So don’t give up your dream, like me. Be strong and do your best.”

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090221/od_uk_nm/oukoe_uk_korea_driver;_ylt=AkonElJB5XDg2UiV0GC7BQrZn414

photo from: http://www.daylife.com/photo/05f4efba7WaFu

Bagong Pahina »